To moblog or Not To moblog

march 23, 2004

Moblog is something of a spin-off of blogging (web-logging). Places like Text America hosts these moblogs -- or mobile blogs -- which are essentially people snapping pictures with their camera phones and uploading them to a website. They can also include the standard blog text to go along with (or without) the pictures. In other words, it is blogging on the run. I thought about the idea of integrating something of a moblog into UltraMookie.com and turning off Snap8, but after two long attempts to get something to work, I have first given up and second come to the conclusion that it is not worth setting up. I tried to setup pMoblog which is a total integration moblog script with pMachine and also EasyMoblog. pMoblog was a pain in the ass to setup because the instructions suck. Then when I was able to get it running, it chopped off the text that I entered and mangled the pictures that I sent. Out with pMoblog. EasyMoblog was certainly easy to setup and it started working like a charm. It was easy to manage with its custom interface and all. The only problem was that it did not seem to want to catch the picture attachments that I sent from my T610. All it got was the text, which sucked. It did surprisingly catch everything when I sent it from my Mail.app in Panther -- but, hey that defeats the purpose of a [b]mobile[/b] blog! So, after that frustration, I gave up on trying to setup a moblog. But, I also came to the conclusion that I did not want to moblog. Why? Because how much could I really tap out using T9 on my T610? Would it really be enough to be intersting? Probably not, maybe a ultra-short paragraph to go with the picture? It really was not worth all the effort. Anyways, with Snap8 I am able to just snap a picture and send it off to get put up. That is all I really need, something simple to receive my pictures and post them for me. Moblogging may sound cool at first, and there are a lot of people doing it -- check out that Text America site -- but in the end, I think that more thoughts and information can be conveyed by a person sitting at a computer with a keyboard, rather than someone using 12-keys and predictive text on a small screen.